roasted peppers


All kinds of Mexican recipes call for roasted peppers. We love to stuff them, fry them, and cover them in sauce, but also to slice them into strips and cook them in stews. The most common pepper for stuffing is the poblano, due to its size and sturdiness. But we roast all sorts of peppers, big and small, mild and spicy, fresh and dried. I’m giving you the template for poblanos, but feel free to use these directions no matter what kind of pepper you want to roast. One of my favorite stuffed chiles is the chile manzano, but it’s seriously spicy (and can be hard to find), so don’t lie about loving heat if you make that one.
Keep the size of the chiles in mind. People can typically eat one large stuffed poblano, or two if the chiles are smaller.
MAKES ABOUT 7 OZ / 200G

4 to 6 large poblano chiles, or as many as you want to roast
On an ungreased comal or in a cast-iron skillet over high heat, roast the chiles, turning them over every couple of minutes using tongs or your hands (carefully, so you don’t get burned). You’re looking for uniform blistering, but you don’t want them to become too soggy in the process, especially if you intend to stuff them, since they need to hold their shape. The process will probably take 10 to 15 minutes. Once they are well blistered and before the flesh is completely charred through in any spots, place the peppers in a plastic container with a tight-fitting lid or in a bowl that you can cover with a plate (not a towel or anything porous) and set aside to “sweat” for about 10 minutes, or until they are cool enough to handle.
Remove the charred skin from the whole chiles, trying your best not to puncture them if you intend to stuff them. If you intend to use your roasted chiles for rajas, or strips, then it obviously matters less if the chile tears. If you are careful, you should be able to remove just the thin skin and none of the flesh of the chile. Begin by using the back of a chef’s knife to rub away the large pieces. Then use your fingers to pick off the smaller bits. Be thorough, since the lingering bits of blackened skin taste bitter and have a reputation for causing indigestion. Once the chile is thoroughly peeled, use a sharp knife to make a slit from the stem to the tip. Reach inside and, using either your fingers or a knife, remove the veins connecting the seeds to the chile, as well as the seeds. (I don’t like to rinse my chiles under water because it removes some of their great flavor.)
Remove the charred skin from the whole chiles, trying your best not to puncture them if you intend to stuff them. If you intend to use your roasted chiles for rajas, or strips, then it obviously matters less if the chile tears. If you are careful, you should be able to remove just the thin skin and none of the flesh of the chile. Begin by using the back of a chef’s knife to rub away the large pieces. Then use your fingers to pick off the smaller bits. Be thorough, since the lingering bits of blackened skin taste bitter and have a reputation for causing indigestion. Once the chile is thoroughly peeled, use a sharp knife to make a slit from the stem to the tip. Reach inside and, using either your fingers or a knife, remove the veins connecting the seeds to the chile, as well as the seeds. (I don’t like to rinse my chiles under water because it removes some of their great flavor.)
Store in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.
roasted peppers roasted peppers Reviewed by sports on November 18, 2019 Rating: 5

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